" Look Into It - Bisphenol A (BPA) Death by Plastic

 

 

 

 
  
                                               

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BPA Death by Plastic

Bisphenol A (BPA) Death by Plastic 

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely used chemical substance. This chemical exists in nearly every plastic container, is used as lining for metal cans, and can even be found on receipts, toilet paper and worldwide currency.

BPA leaches from its container into whatever it happens to contain. If you microwave a TV dinner for example, the chemical content of the plastic container would find its way into the food you are going to eat. Likewise, when bottled water or a soft drink is manufactured and shelved, BPA leaches into the liquid over the time it takes to be purchased and consumed.

Because of its widespread application in all forms of packaging, manufacturing and otherwise, chances are that you are somehow interacting with this substance on a daily basis. Many other countries have already declared BPA a toxin and prohibited its usage in a number of products.

It's in nearly everyone's bloodstream.  And now, Canada has declared BPA a toxic substance, both to the environment and to public health.

 

 




  

BPA Death by Plastic - Special Report

 

Aaron Dykes hosts a segment on Bisphenol A, the dangerous estrogenic in plastic drinking bottles and food containers. BPA is a known toxic substance outlawed in Canada and Europe, but still used in the United States, even though the FDA raised concerns regarding exposure of fetuses, infants and young children to the substance.
http://www.infowars.com/
http://www.prisonplanet.tv/news/ 

 

 

 

 

 

Uncovering Bisphenol A - Covert Depopulation

 

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical building block that is used primarily to make polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins. Use in some food and drink packaging, e.g., water and infant bottles, compact discs, impact-resistant safety equipment, and medical devices. Epoxy resins are used as lacquers to coat metal products such as food cans, beer cans, bottle tops, and water supply pipes.

A known endocrine disrupter which in large quantities interferes with the release of hormones, also known to cause Infertility and Cancer.

Bisphenol A (BPA) now linked to Male Infertility:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/healthnews/8093585/Bisphenol-A-now-linked-t...

BPA link to Prostate Cancer:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-1318181/Gender-bending-chemicals-pl...

BPA info:
http://www.naturalnews.com/022848.html

Study finds Bisphenol A on money:
http://thechart.blogs.cnn.com/2010/12/08/study-finds-bisphenol-a-on-money/

 

 

 

 

BPA Sex Hormone in a Can

 

 

 

 Bisphenol A (BPA) Death by Plastic

 

 

 

Are You Exposing Yourself to Toxic BPA?

 

Andre Evans
Natural Society 
January 20, 2012

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widely used chemical substance. This chemical exists in nearly every plastic container, is used as lining for metal cans, and can even be found on receipts, toilet paper and worldwide currency.

BPA leaches from its container into whatever it happens to contain. If you microwave a TV dinner for example, the chemical content of the plastic container would find its way into the food you are going to eat. Likewise, when bottled water or a soft drink is manufactured and shelved, BPA leaches into the liquid over the time it takes to be purchased and consumed.

Because of its widespread application in all forms of packaging, manufacturing and otherwise, chances are that you are somehow interacting with this substance on a daily basis. Many other countries have already declared BPA a toxin and prohibited its usage in a number of products.

BPA’s Role in Disease

BPA is an endocrine disruptor. It mimics the natural hormones produced by your body, specifically estrogen. When your body interacts with BPA, it delivers an estrogen-mimicking effect. This is known to lead to a host of health problems including infertility, cancer, weight gain and more. This hormonal interference may also be responsible for accelerating puberty and altering the growth of children, causing hormonal confusion.

Many studies suggest a widespread range of additional effects, including altered immune function, neurological and behavior problems, heart disease, and diabetes. Even low levels of exposure can cause adverse effects on health. Its been stated that 95% of paper money has been found to contain BPA, which means that an equally large fraction of individuals worldwide have at some point been exposed to this chemical at least from touching it on a regular basis.

What is more dangerous is that due to its use in food preservation, many people are unwittingly consuming this harmful chemical, which is much worse than topical exposure. The widespread effects of BPA are being increasingly recognized throughout the world. Despite this, once its presence in society is removed, one can expect the number of health issues associated to vanish alongside it.

 

 

 

Canada Declares BPA Toxic. Why Isn’t the US Following Suit?

 
November 02, 2010
Bisphenol A (BPA) Death by PlasticBisphenol A (BPA) is used in an enormous number of products. It's in nearly everyone's bloodstream. And now, Canada has declared BPA a toxic substance, both to the environment and to public health.

Canadian officials said that the declaration is the first step toward better BPA regulation. Now that the chemical is classified as toxic, it's easier for the Canadian government to ban BPA in specific products. Canada has already banned BPA in baby bottles, and the new listing will likely bring an end to all food-related uses for BPA in the country.

Writing in Time Magazine, Bryan Walsh reports:

"The Canadian move was done in the face of intense opposition from the chemical industry, which was quick to respond to the decision ...

What's clear, however, is that there is a growing public concern about the possible impact of chemicals in the environment -- especially on pregnant women and developing fetuses ...

The science will never be fully certain, but the pendulum is moving in the direction of a greater emphasis on safety -- and I think it's time."

    

Dr. Mercola's Comments:   
Follow Dr. Mercola on Twitter     Follow Dr. Mercola on Facebook   
 

Bisphenol-A (BPA) has already been detected in the urine of 95 percent of people tested, and with the outpouring of research showing it can trigger major changes in your body even at low-level exposure, Canada is doing what's necessary … they're getting the ball rolling to get BPA out of food packaging and other consumer products.

The country has   added BPA to their list of toxic substances, noting:

"Concern for neurobehavioural effects in newborns and infants was suggested from the neurodevelopmental and behavioural dataset in rodents.

Given that available data indicate potential sensitivity to the pregnant woman/fetus and infant, and that animal studies suggest a trend towards heightened susceptibility during stages of development in rodents, it was considered appropriate to apply a precautionary approach when characterizing risk to human health.

Therefore, it was concluded that bisphenol A should be considered as a substance that may be entering the environment in a quantity or concentration or under conditions that constitute or may constitute a danger in Canada to human life or health." 

Notice the term "precautionary approach" … this is what is sorely lacking in so many areas in the United States,The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) frequently drops the ball when it comes to regulating  toxic chemicals like BPA and mercury.

BPA in baby bottles has been banned in Canada and several U.S. states. Other measures are being considered in 30 U.S. states and municipalities -- but at a federal level, the FDA is treading water.

Why?

Why Isn't the FDA Taking Action Against BPA?

According to the FDA, its regulatory framework limits its ability to regulate BPA production.

That's right. Under its current construction, the FDA is unable to remove a toxic chemical that is leaching into canned goods and other common foods as we speak, because it was classified in 1963 as an indirect food additive and is listed among the 3,000 or so chemicals categorized as GRAS ("generally regarded as safe").

This outdated GRAS designation is what exempts BPA from more careful scrutiny and analysis.

According to the FDA's regulations, a substance granted GRAS status is not subject to FDA review. The Agency explains these limitations via an   "update" on its website:

"Current BPA food contact uses were approved under food additive regulations issued more than 40 years ago. This regulatory structure limits the oversight and flexibility of the FDA.

Once a food additive is approved, any manufacturer of food or food packaging may use the food additive in accordance with the regulation. There is no requirement to notify the FDA of that use.

For example, today there exist hundreds of different formulations for BPA-containing epoxy linings, which have varying characteristics. As currently regulated, manufacturers are not required to disclose to FDA the existence or nature of these formulations.

Furthermore, if the FDA were to decide to revoke one or more approved uses, the FDA would need to undertake what could be a lengthy process of rulemaking to accomplish this goal." 

The FDA's Hands are Tied?

What this means is that the FDA can ask chemical companies to volunteer information about BPA, but this voluntary system does not have a history of working well when it comes to corporations who have billions of dollars at stake.

As it stands, BPA is one of the world's highest production-volume chemicals and is widely used in the production of:

  • Plastic water bottles  
  • Plastic gallon milk bottles  
  • Plastic microwavable plates, ovenware, and utensils  
  • Baby toys, bottles, pacifiers, and sippy cups  
  • Canned foods and soda cans (most have plastic lining in the cans)  
  •  Tooth sealants  

The American Chemistry Council, a lobby group for the chemical industry that issued a statement in early 2010 denying the health hazards of BPA, clearly does not want to see this cash cow bite the dust ... nor be held accountable for health problems related to its use. They will pull out all the stops to keep this chemical in your food packaging, baby bottles, and more for as long as possible.

Meanwhile, the FDA has admitted that they can basically do nothing to get BPA out of consumer goods without a formal change in the law, and this is despite the fact that they've   acknowledged "concerns" related to its use:

" … [O]n the basis of results from recent studies using novel approaches to test for subtle effects, both the National Toxicology Program at the National Institutes of Health and FDA have some concern about the potential effects of BPA on the brain, behavior, and prostate gland in fetuses, infants, and young children."

Congress has introduced legislation intended to establish a   federal ban on BPA in all food and beverage containers, but for now the chemical is still widely used.

What Does the Research Say About BPA?

Of 115 published animal studies, 81 percent found significant effects from even low-level exposure to BPA.

This toxic chemical, an endocrine disrupter, first caught researchers' attention after normal mice began to display uncommon genetic abnormalities. The defects were linked to plastic cages and water bottles that had been cleaned with a harsh detergent, causing BPA to leach out of the plastic.

After determining how much BPA the mice had been exposed to, the researchers realized even an extremely small dose of 20 parts per billion daily, for just five to seven days, was enough to produce effects.

Some of the greatest concern surrounds   early-life exposure to BPA, which can lead to chromosomal errors in the developing fetus, triggering spontaneous miscarriages and genetic damage. And being exposed to just 0.23 parts per billion of BPA is enough to disrupt the effect of   estrogen in a baby's developing brain.

For this reason, women of childbearing age and those who are pregnant should be especially diligent at avoiding BPA, but practically no one is immune. One recent study found the chemical can lead to heart disease, diabetes and liver problems in adults, and previous research has linked BPA to:

  • Structural damage to your brain  
  • Hyperactivity, increased aggressiveness, and impaired learning  
  • Increased fat formation and risk of obesity  
  • Altered immune function  
  • Early puberty, stimulation of mammary gland development, disrupted reproductive cycles, and ovarian dysfunction  
  • Changes in gender-specific behavior, and abnormal sexual behavior  
  • Stimulation of prostate cancer cells  
  • Increased prostate size, and decreased sperm production  
  • Diabetes  
  • Heart disease  
  • Liver damage  

Tips for Staying Away From BPA

The Environmental Working Group is keeping tabs on BPA legislation in the United States and globally, and you can  view its timeline here. As of late summer 2010, BPA bills were pending in five state legislatures, and earlier this year numerous positive steps have been made to get this toxin out of U.S. food containers:

  • Vermont banned BPA in baby food, formula and bottles, and will restrict its use in metal food cans starting July 1, 2014  
  • New York state banned BPA in bottles, sippy cups, pacifiers and drinking straws beginning December 2010  
  • General Mills announced in April 2010 that it would use BPA-free cans for Muir Glen organic tomatoes starting with the next harvest  

Hopefully this type of legislation will continue to snowball until a worldwide ban is placed on this toxin, making it one less that you'll need to worry about. But in the meantime, the following tips will help you to steer clear of BPA as much as possible:

  1. Only use glass baby bottles and dishes for your baby.  
  2. Get rid of your plastic dishes and cups, and replace them with glass varieties.  
  3. Give your baby natural fabric toys instead of plastic ones, and only BPA-free pacifiers and teethers.  
  4. Store your food and beverages in glass -- NOT plastic -- containers. Glass is the safest and most inert way to store your water and food, and is far better than ANY plastic (even BPA-free varieties).  
  5. IF you choose to use a microwave, don't microwave food in a plastic container.  
  6. Use glass, ceramic, or stainless steel travel coffee mugs rather than plastic or Styrofoam coffee cups.  
  7. Avoid using plastic wrap (and never microwave anything covered in it).  
  8. If you opt to use plastic kitchenware, at least get rid of the older, scratched-up varieties, avoid putting them in the dishwasher, and don't wash them with harsh detergents, as these things can cause more BPA to leach into your food.  
  9. Avoid using bottled water; filter your own using a high-quality filter instead.  
  10. Before allowing a dental sealant to be applied to your, or your children's, teeth, ask your dentist to verify that it does not contain BPA.  
  11. Avoid using canned foods (including soda cans) as the linings often contain BPA. If you do eat canned foods, choose only those that   come in BPA-free cans  

 

 

Bisphenol A (BPA) Death by Plastic

 

 

 

Bisphenol A (BPA) Death by Plastic

BPA causes changes to your brain, not just your body

Wednesday, September 19, 2012 by: PF Louis
Tags: BPA, nervous system, plastics chemical

 

(NaturalNews)

Bisphenol A (BPA) has been a chemical item of great health concerns for the past few years. It's common in many plastics, including plastic food and beverage containers, inner epoxy linings of cans used for canned foods, thermal paper, and paper money.

BPA leaches into the liquids and foods in those containers. It also leaches into your blood through the skin while handling paper money and thermal paper, commonly used for printing receipts.

Although the FDA refuses to consider BPA unsafe, other nations have. Several have banned BPA. The researched health hazards include links to cancer, especially breast cancer, and hormone imbalances causing physical/sexual manifestations that affect both genders of all ages.

Even a CDC, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2003-04 study found that 93 percent of over 2,500 Americans surveyed had measurable BPA in their blood. Unfortunately, BPA remains in the bloodstream for a long time unless the right nutritional antidotes are taken, which are discussed later in this article.

That means expectant mothers can pass BPA on to their newborns while in the womb and afterward while breastfeeding. Also, beware of plastic baby bottles that aren't BPA free.


BPA also affects the brain and nervous system

A recent animal study using mice at North Carolina State University proved that the brain and nervous system are also affected adversely by BPA. Here's their research paper published in the journal PLOS ONE. (http://www.plosone.org)

Summarizing: The rats were divided into different groups, some fed BPA levels comparable to human levels, some not fed BPA, and others fed BPA with soy. They discovered that early exposure to BPA causes gene expression changes that affect the molecules of a part of the brain known as the amygdala.

This region of the brain is responsible for dealing with response to fear and stress. It also affects social behavior. Another human pediatric study determined neurological effects from BPA at three years of age, especially among girls. Anxiety and/or depression were the common symptoms.

Ironically, soy's estrogen mimicking element, genistein, seemed to counteract or block BPA's estrogen mimicking ability in the study. That's like fighting fire with fire. The scientists doing this research seem to desire exploring soy's BPA neutralizing properties.

They probably don't know why many informed foodies reject soy: Most are GMOs; non-GMO soy is difficult to digest unless fermented, and just how would they know when the BPA level has been neutralized by soy, allowing soy's genistein to take over the estrogen mimicking function, causing problems all over again?


Preventing and getting rid of BPA

Phase into glass and ceramic containers as much as possible. If you must use plastic, try to keep the container cool and out of sunlight. Plastic containers have recycle numbers placed with triangles, usually at the bottom of the container. Those numbered one or five are the least harmful.

If a canned food item doesn't have "BPS-free" on the label, leave it on the shelf. After handling thermal paper or paper money, wash your hands thoroughly. If your work demands considerable handling with either type of paper, try wearing thin latex gloves.



Now here are those antidotes to BPA's estrogen mimicry:

Increase probiotic consumption. Probiotic supplements should include bifidobacterium breve, lactobacillus casei, bacillus pumilus, and bifidobacterium 3.

Instead of expensive supplements, you can use homemade water or milk kefir, and fermented foods such as kimchi, sauerkraut, miso, and tempeh. (http://www.naturalnews.com)

Black tea and Royal Jelly also work well. Supplementing with melatonin (for sleep only), folic acid, or quercetin are other good choices. Genistein extracts are contraindicative to pharmaceuticals for allopathic breast cancer patients.

Caveat: Bisphenol-S (BPS) may have replaced BPA in many products. Though apparently not as strong, its properties are similar to BPA.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.prisonplanet.com

http://naturalsociety.com

http://naturalsociety.com/toxic-bpa-substitute-bps-chemical/

http://news.ncsu.edu/releases/wms-patisaul-amygdala/

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org

Learn more:

http://www.naturalnews.com/037241_bpa_nervous_system_plastics_chemical.html#ixzz2gNq6jQl1 

 

 

 

  

Study finds bisphenol A on money

 

Bisphenol A (BPA) Death by Plastic

 

A new report says Bisphenol A (BPA), the controversial hormone disrupting chemical widely used in plastics, is turning up in an unlikely place–the money in your wallet.

Researchers suggest that BPA is rubbing off cashier receipts and onto bills, according to a report titled "On The Money: BPA on Dollar Bills and Receipts," published by the Safer Chemicals, Healthy Families, and the Washington Toxics Coalition (WTC).

Ericka Schreder, a staff Scientist with WTC and author of the report, says lab tests confirm the chemical rubs off receipts onto the skin after holding it for just 10 seconds. WTC researchers first tested 22 thermal paper receipts collected from businesses in 10 states and the District of Columbia. Half contained higher than trace amounts of BPA. They also tested 22 $1 bills and found BPA on 21 of them. Schreder says contamination most likely occurs once receipts come in contact with money in places like wallets and cash register drawers.

"Levels on dollar bills were lower than on receipts, but the fact that our currency is contaminated with a hormone-disrupting chemical illustrates how our current chemical law is failing us," Schreder says. "Even the most careful consumer can't avoid BPA when it's so pervasive that it even contaminates money."

But Kathryn St. John, a BPA specialist at the American Chemistry Council says while some receipts made from thermal paper can have low levels of BPA, research shows it's safe.

"To the limited extent BPA is absorbed through the skin, it is converted to a biologically inactive metabolite that is rapidly eliminated from the body," St. John said. "Biomonitoring data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control shows that consumer exposure to BPA, which would include any exposure from receipts, is extremely low. Typical exposure from all sources is about 1,000 times below safe intake levels set by government bodies in Europe and the U.S. In comparison, the trace levels of BPA claimed to be present in dollar bills are insignificant."

In July, The Environmental Working Group released a similar study about BPA and cash register receipts. EWG researchers tested 36 and found 40 percent had high levels of the chemical.

Environmental groups and public health advocates have linked BPA to a number of serious health problems including cancer, diabetes, infertility, early puberty and heart disease. According to the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), 93 percent of urine samples from people over the age of 6 have detectable levels of BPA, but research linking some health problems—particularly in adults–to the chemical has been inconclusive. Still, earlier this year the FDA said recent studies "provide reason for some concern about the potential effects of BPA on the brain, behavior, and prostate gland of fetuses, infants and children."

Schreder says with the growing body of evidence, it's clear reform of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA)–which gives the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) the authority to regulate chemicals–should be a priority.

"We need to update the 1976 Toxic Substances Control Act with a new chemical law that both requires companies to provide health information on chemicals they produce and ensures that chemicals that can cause cancer, infertility, and other health problems can't be used in everyday products."

 

 

 

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Bisphenol A (BPA) Death by Plastic 

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